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The Dangers of Attachment Print E-mail

Introduction

Using the tools of practice entails hardship and arduous challenges. We rely on patience, endurance and going without. We have to do it ourselves, experience it for ourselves, realize it ourselves.

Scholars, however, tend to get confused a lot. For example, when they sit in meditation, as soon as their minds experience a teeny bit of tranquillity they start to think, “Hey, this must be first jhána.”

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Sìla, Samádhi, and Paññá Print E-mail

Introduction

I practised Dhamma without knowing a great deal. I just knew that the path to liberation began with virtue (sìla). Virtue is the beautiful beginning of the Path; the deep peace of samádhi is the beautiful middle; wisdom (paññá) is the beautiful end. Although they can be separated as three unique aspects of the training, as we look into them more and more deeply, these three qualities converge as one.

To uphold virtue, you have to be wise. We usually advise people to develop ethical standards first by keeping the five precepts so that their virtue will become solid. However, the perfection of virtue takes a lot of wisdom. We have to consider our speech and actions, and analyze their consequences. This is all the work of wisdom. We have to rely on our wisdom in order to cultivate virtue.

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Unshakeable Peace Print E-mail

Introduction

The whole reason for studying the Dhamma, the teachings of the Buddha, is to search for a way to transcend suffering and attain peace and happiness.

Whether we study physical or mental phenomena, the mind (citta) or its psychological factors (cetasiká), it’s only when we make liberation from suffering our ultimate goal that we’re on the right path—nothing less. Suffering has a cause and conditions for its existence.

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A Dhamma talk On Meditation Print E-mail

Introduction

Seekers of goodness who have gathered here, please listen in peace. Listening to the Dhamma in peace means to listen with a one-pointed mind, paying attention to what you hear and then letting go. Listening to the Dhamma is of great benefit.

While listening to the Dhamma we are encouraged to firmly establish both body and mind in samádhi, because it is one kind of Dhamma practice. In the time of the Buddha people listened to Dhamma talks intently, with a mind aspiring to real understanding, and some actually realized the Dhamma while listening.

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The Buddhist Conception of Truth Print E-mail

Introduction

“One of the five precepts that a Buddhist has to undertake to observe is that of ‘refraining from saying what is false.’ Stated in its negative as well as positive form he has to ‘refrain from saying what is false, assert what is true (sacca-vádi), be devoted to the truth (sacca-sandha), be reliable (theta), trustworthy (paccayika) and not be one who deceives the world (avisam-vadako lokassa)’ (A II 209).

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