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Our Reactions to Dukkha Print E-mail

Introduction

“Now this, monks, is the Noble Truth about ill. Birth is ill, Ageing is ill, Sickness is ill, Death is ill, likewise Sorrow and Grief, Woe, Lamentation and Despair. To be conjoined with things we dislike, to be separated from things which we like — that also is ill. Not to get what one wants, that also is ill, In a word, this Body, this fivefold mass which is based on grasping, that is ill.”     — SN 5

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The Discourse on the Tamed Sage Print E-mail

Introduction

Thus have I heard: At one time the Lord was staying near Rajagaha in the Bamboo Grove at the squirrels' feeding place. Now at that time the novice Aciravata was staying in the Forest Hut.[1] Then prince Jayasena,[2] who was always pacing up and down, always roaming about on foot, approached the novice Aciravata; having approached he exchanged greetings with the novice Aciravata; having exchanged greetings of friendliness and courtesy, he sat down at a respectful distance. While he was sitting down at a respectful distance, Prince Jayasena spoke thus to the novice Aciravata:

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Nibbana as Living Experience Print E-mail

Introduction

Nibbana [nibbaana] is the culmination of the Buddhist quest for perfection  and happiness. In order to understand the meaning of this term it is useful to refer to the verse attributed to Kisa Gotami when she saw Prince Siddhattha returning to the palace from the park on the eve of his great renunciation.

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Emancipation From The World Print E-mail
Introduction

Vipassaná meditation is mental training aimed at raising the mind to such a level that it is no longer subject to suffering. The mind breaks free from suffering by virtue of the knowledge that nothing is worth grasping at or clinging to. This knowledge deprives worldly things of their ability to lead the mind into further thoughtless liking or disliking.
 
Magandia Sutta Print E-mail

Introduction

Magandiya, suppose that there was a leper covered with sores and infections, devoured by worms, picking the scabs off the openings of his wounds with his nails, cauterizing his body over a pit of glowing embers.

His friends, companions, and relatives would take him to a doctor. The doctor would concoct medicine for him, and thanks to the medicine he would be cured of his leprosy: well and happy, free, master of himself, going wherever he liked.

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