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Anathapindika Print E-mail

Introduction

Thus have I heard: One time the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi in the Jeta Grove, in Anathapindika's Monastery..." Numerous discourses of the Buddha begin with these words, and hence the name of that great lay devotee, Anathapindika is well known.

His name means: "One who gives alms (pinda) to the unprotected (a-natha)" and is the honorific of the householder Sudatta of the city of Savatthi. Who was he? How did he meet the Buddha? What was his relationship to the teaching? The answers to these questions may be found in the many references to him which occur in the traditional texts.

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Ananda, Thre Guardian of the Dhamma Print E-mail

Introduction

His unique position had already begun before his birth. He came to earth, just as the Buddha did, from the Tusita heaven, and was born on the same day as he and in the same caste, namely the warrior caste of the royal family of the Sakyas. Their fathers were brothers, so that Ananda was the Buddha's cousin. He had three brothers, Anuruddha, Mahanama, Pandu, and one sister, Rohini.

Anuruddha entered the Sangha together with Ananda and became an arahant, a fully enlightened one. Mahanama, the prince of the Sakyas, became a once-returner as a householder, while the only thing known about Pandu is the fact that he survived the near-extinction of the Sakya clan during the Buddha's 80th year.

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The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to the End of Suffering Print E-mail

Introduction

The search for a spiritual path is born out of suffering. It does not start with lights and ecstasy, but with the hard tacks of pain, disappointment, and confusion. However, for suffering to give birth to a genuine spiritual search, it must amount to more than something passively received from without. It has to trigger an inner realization, a perception which pierces through the facile complacency of our usual encounter with the world to glimpse the insecurity perpetually gaping underfoot. When this insight dawns, even if only momentarily, it can precipitate a profound personal crisis. It overturns accustomed goals and values, mocks our routine preoccupations, leaves old enjoyments stubbornly unsatisfying.

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Ordination In Theravada Buddhism Print E-mail

Introduction

This  general introduction briefly explains the history of the Novice Ordination (pabbajjá or `going forth'), the Higher Ordination (upasampadá) and the functions of a novice (sámanera) and a monk (bhikkhu), in Theraváda Buddhism.

The article that follows gives a graphic account of a Higher Ordination ceremony as witnessed by Mr. J. F. Dickson at Malwatta monastery, Kandy, Sri Lanka, in 1872. A few shortcomings and errors in the essay have been corrected.

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The Life of Osbert Moore Print E-mail

Introduction

Having a brief life sketch by Maurice Cardiff as fuel for thought, supplemented by the subject's own words in the form of a posthumously published Note Book of his thoughts, it becomes obvious that the man who became known to the Buddhist world as Bhikkhu Ñanamoli was a complex and ambiguous person.

On the one hand, a deep and careful thinker, always seeking a more complete understanding of whatever subject he was examining, and on the other, a playful and merry mischief-maker, someone who delighted in coming up with word puns and other playful tricks which kept his always curious mind in motion.

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