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Dedication to the Practice Print E-mail

Introduction

So I’ve told you a few brief stories about how I practised. I didn’t have a lot of knowledge. I didn’t study much. What I did study was this heart and mind of mine, and I learned in a natural way through experimentation, trial and error.

When I liked something, then I examined what was going on and where it would lead. Inevitably, it would drag me to some distant suffering. My practice was to observe myself. As understanding and insight deepened, gradually I came to know myself.

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Following the Middle Path Print E-mail

Introduction

It’s the shortest and most direct path. You can come and argue with me on points of Dhamma, but I won’t join in. Rather than argue back, I’d just offer some reflections for you to consider.

Please understand what the Buddha taught: let go of everything. Let go with knowing and awareness. Without knowing and awareness, the letting go is no different than that of cows and water buffaloes.

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Changing our Vision Print E-mail

Introduction

In my life of practising Dhamma, I didn’t attempt to master a wide range of subjects. Just one. I refined this heart.

Say we look at a body. If we find that we’re attracted to a body then analyze it. Have a good look: head hair, body hair, nails, teeth and skin.

The Buddha taught us to thoroughly and repeatedly contemplate these parts of the body. Visualize them separately, pull them apart, peel off the skin and burn them up. This is how to do it. Stick with this meditation until it’s firmly established and unwavering. See everyone the same.

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The Dangers of Attachment Print E-mail

Introduction

Using the tools of practice entails hardship and arduous challenges. We rely on patience, endurance and going without. We have to do it ourselves, experience it for ourselves, realize it ourselves.

Scholars, however, tend to get confused a lot. For example, when they sit in meditation, as soon as their minds experience a teeny bit of tranquillity they start to think, “Hey, this must be first jhána.”

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Sìla, Samádhi, and Paññá Print E-mail

Introduction

I practised Dhamma without knowing a great deal. I just knew that the path to liberation began with virtue (sìla). Virtue is the beautiful beginning of the Path; the deep peace of samádhi is the beautiful middle; wisdom (paññá) is the beautiful end. Although they can be separated as three unique aspects of the training, as we look into them more and more deeply, these three qualities converge as one.

To uphold virtue, you have to be wise. We usually advise people to develop ethical standards first by keeping the five precepts so that their virtue will become solid. However, the perfection of virtue takes a lot of wisdom. We have to consider our speech and actions, and analyze their consequences. This is all the work of wisdom. We have to rely on our wisdom in order to cultivate virtue.

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