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Compassion Print E-mail

Introduction

Karu.naa is the Paali word translated as compassion. Contemporary writers have spoken of it thus:

“It is defined as that which makes the heart of the good quiver when others are subject to suffering, or that which dissipates the suffering of others. “ (See Naarada Mahaathera, The Buddha and His Teachings, BPS, 1988, p.372)

“Compassion is a virtue which uproots the wish to harm others. It makes people so sensitive to the sufferings of others and causes them to make these sufferings so much their own that they do not want to further increase them.” (See Edward Conze, Buddhist Thought in India, 1960, Ch.6)

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Protection Through Satipatthana Print E-mail

Introduction

Once the Buddha told his monks the following story (Satipatthana Samyutta, No. 19):

There was once a pair of jugglers who performed their acrobatic feats on a bamboo pole. One day the master said to his apprentice:

"Now get on my shoulders and climb up the bamboo pole."

When the apprentice had done so, the master said:

"Now protect me well and I shall protect you! By protecting and watching each other in that way, we shall be able to show our skill, make a good profit and safely get down from the bamboo pole."

But the apprentice said:

"Not so, master! You, O master, should protect yourself, and I too shall protect myself. Thus self-protected and self-guarded we shall safely do our feats."

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Ministering to the Sick and the Terminally III Print E-mail

Introduction

He who attends on the sick attends on me," declared the Buddha, exhorting his disciples on the importance of ministering to the sick. This famous statement was made by the Blessed One when he discovered a monk lying in his soiled robes, desperately ill with an acute attack of dysentery.

With the help of Ananda, the Buddha washed and cleaned the sick monk in warm water. On this occasion he reminded the monks that they have neither parents nor relatives to look after them, so they must look after one another. If the teacher is ill, it is the bounden duty of the pupil to look after him, and if the pupil is ill, it is the teacher's duty to look after the sick pupil. If a teacher or a pupil is not available, it is the responsibility of the community to look after the sick (Vin.i,301ff.).

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Understanding & Managing Stress Print E-mail

Introduction

Stress is a term adopted from engineering science by psychology and medicine. Simply defined, stress in engineering means force upon an area.

As so many forces are working upon us in the modern age, and we find it extremely difficult to cope under so much pressure, stress is called the "disease of civilization."

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Self Made Private Prison Print E-mail

Introduction

According to the teachings of the Buddha the human personality comprises five "aggregates of grasping..."  They are enumerated as:

 

  • the aggregate of body;
  • the aggregate of feelings;
  • the aggregate of perception;
  • the aggregate of volitional activities;
  • the aggregate of consciousness;

 

We may wonder why the Buddha mentions only five aggregates, no more and no less. We can attempt to answer this question by analyzing any unit of experience in our day-to-day life. Suppose, for instance, we hear a big noise on the road, and we rush to the spot and recognize that a motorcycle accident has taken place; we feel sorry for the victim and want to rush him to the hospital. If we look at this experience and analyze the physical and mental phenomena involved, we will notice that they can be accommodated within the five aggregates of grasping.

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