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Evil Actions May Ripen in the Sense-Sphere Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

Narada Mahha Thera, in The Buddha and his Teachings,1998, delineated what the Buddha said about the consequences of evil actions:

“There are ten evil actions caused by deed, word, and mind which produce evil kamma.

“Of them three are committed by deed – namely, killing (pānātipāta), stealing (adinnādāna), and sexual misconduct (kāmesu micchācāra).

“Four are committed by word – namely, lying (musāvāda), slandering (pisunavācā), harsh speech (pharusavāca), and frivolous talk (samphappalāpa).

“Three are committed by mind – namely, covetousness (abhijjhā), ill-will (vyāpāda), and falseview (micchā ditthi).

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Upekkhā Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

Of the Four Sublime States of mettā, karunā and muditā and  upekkhā, the fourth and final state is the hardest to uderstand and to cultivate.

Narada Thera In the Buddha and his Teching, 1998, expertly translated and narrated the following teaching about upekkhā or equanimity:

“The fourth sublime state is the most difficult and the most essential.

It is upekkhā or equanimity. The etymo-logical meaning of the term upekkhā is 'discerning rightly,' 'viewing justly' or 'looking impartially,' that is, without attachment or aversion, without favour or disfavour.

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How the Buddha Faced Abuse Print E-mail

Introduction

In the ninth year of his ministry, the Buddha spent the rainy season at Kosombi.

It was in this year that Māgandiyā,  the beautiful daughter of  wealthy brahmin came to harbour a grudge against the Buddha and sought an opportunity to dishonour him.

Narada Maha Thera, in The Buddha and His Teachings, 1998, translates and narrates the story:

“Māgandiyā was a beautiful maiden. Her parents would not give her in marriage as the prospective suitors, in their opinion, were not worthy of their daughter.

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Different Kinds of Kammic Results Print E-mail

Introduction

Narada Maha Thera, in The Buddha and his Teachings (1998) translates and narrates what the Buddha said about the karmic results of different types of actions. Following are some illustrations:

The result of a good kamma reaped in this life:

“A husband and his wife possessed only one upper garment to wear when they went out-of-doors. One day the husband heard the Dhamma from the Buddha and was so pleased with the doctrine that he wished to offer his only upper garment, but his innate greed would not permit him to do so. He combatted with his mind and, ultimately overcoming his greed, offered the garment to the Buddha and exclaimed 'I have won, I have won.' The king was delighted to hear his story and in appreciation of his generosity presented him thirty-two robes. The devout husband kept one for himself and another for his wife and offered the rest to the Buddha.

(Buddhist Legends Dhammapadatthakathā, pt. 2, p. 262)

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How Good Kamma May Ripen Print E-mail

Introduction

Narada Maha Thera, in The Buddha and His Teachings (1998) translates and narrates what the Buddha said about good kamma leading to good results:

“There are ten kinds of such meritorious actions (kusala kamma):— namely,

(1) Generosity (dāna),
(2) Morality (sīla),
(3) Meditation (bhāvanā)
(4) Reverence (apacāyana),
(5) Service (veyyāvacca).
(6) Transference of merit (pattidāna),
(7) Rejoicing in others’ good actions (anumodanā),
(8) Hearing the doctrine (dhamma savana),
(9) Expounding the doctrine (dhammadesanā) and
(10) Straightening one’s own views (ditthijjukamma).

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