Share on Facebook
New Postings
The Buddha and His Disciples Print E-mail

Introduction

The life of the Buddha is more than an account of one man's quest for and realization of the truth; it is also about the people who encountered that man during his forty-five year career and how their encounter transformed them. If the Buddha's quest and his encounters with others is set against the backdrop of the world in which these events were acted out, a world with its unique customs, its political intrigue and its religious ferment, it becomes one of the most fascinating stories ever told.

PDF Format
Download Zipped e-article

 
Venerable Ajaan Mun’s Practice Print E-mail

Introduction

We are getting near the end of this book, so it is appropriate that we should discuss the methods of practising citta bhāvanā that Venerable Ajaan Mun used, as well as the methods which he used in teaching those fol-lowers of his who went into training under him. This may act as sort of a guide to the way, in the form of a brief summary. But in particular, the way that he himself practised will first be considered, after which, the way he taught his close followers will be described. In this section, the names of the places where he practised and gained results will not be given, because they have already been detailed in his biography. So the following account will only deal with his methods of practising citta bhāvanā and all external phenomena such as contact with Pretas, ghosts, Devaputta, Devatā, Nāgas, Garuḍas, etc., will be omitted as they have already been described.

PDF Format
Download Zipped e-article

 
Forest Path Print E-mail

Introduction

Wat Pa Nanachat has published many books over the years — in English and in Thai — but never a newsletter. This year we decided to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of a conservative wat by breaking with tradition. So many people contributed to the project however, and with such enthusiasm, that a sambhavesi1 newsletter finally entered the world of print as this 250 page book.

PDF Format
Download Zipped e-article

 
Stories of Old Print E-mail

Introduction

About two thousand years ago there was a young man living in Rohana not far from the southern capital of Mahāgāma. He came from a family of hunters, and they lived near the great monastery of Gāmendavāla.

When he grew up, he decided to take a wife and raise a family. So he worked hard, trapping creatures in the jungle, selling the meat and making a profit. He was in fact very diligent in this for some years, and he was able to lay up for himself quite a little money and quite a lot of future suffering.

One day he went into the woods as usual, and as he felt hungry, he killed a deer caught in one of his traps, grilled the meat over a fire and ate it. Then he was thirsty but there was no water, so he had to walk a long way to the great monastery of Gāmendavāla. When he got there, he went to where the drinking water was kept; but though ten pitchers were there as usual, he found them all empty. He was parched by then, and losing his temper a little, he exclaimed:

“Well really! All these bhikkhus living here and not a drop of water for visitors!”

PDF Format
Download Zipped e-article

 
Buddhist Stories: From the Dhammapada Commentary, Part IV Print E-mail

Introduction

Nanda Becomes a Monk in Spite of Himself

For after the Teacher had set in motion the glorious Wheel of Dhamma, he retired to Rājagaha and took up residence at Veḷuvana. Thereupon his father, the great king Suddhodana, sent ten ambassadors to him, one after the other, each with a retinue of a thousand men, saying to them, “Bring my son here and show him to me before my face.”

PDF Format
Download Zipped e-article

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 29