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The Three Signata Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

Nyanatiloka Maha Thera, in The Word of the Buddha (1967) translates what the Blessed One said about the three essential truths of impermanence, suffering and non-self:

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The Invitation to Expound the Dhamma Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

Narada Maha Thera in The Buddha and His Teachings, 1998, translates and narrates how the Blesed One at first douted that anyone else could understand the Dhamma he had discovered, and was disinclined to teach it, but the Brahma Sahampati appeared to him and pleaded with the Buddha to share what he had discovered.

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Concerning Concentration Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

Piyadassi Maha Thera in The Seven Factors of Enlightenment (1960) explains the factor of (samadhi) concentration :

“It is only the tranquillized mind that can easily concentrate on a subject of meditation. The calm, concentrated mind sees things as they really are (samahito yatha bhutam pajanati). The unified mind brings the five hindrances (pañca nivaranani) under subjugation.

“Concentration is the intensified steadiness of the mind, comparable to an unflickering flame of a lamp in a windless place. It fixes the mind aright and causes it to be unmoved and undisturbed. Correct practice of samadhi maintains the mind and the mental properties in a state of balance like a steady hand holding a pair of scales. Right concentration dispels passions that disturb the mind, and brings purity and placidity of mind. The concentrated mind is not distracted by sense objects; concentration of the highest type cannot be disturbed under the most adverse circumstances.

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Renunciation Print E-mail

Introduction

In The Buddha And His Teachings (1998) concerning the perfections (pāramī) of a Bodhisatta, Narada Maha Thera translates and narrates  what the Buddha said about the value of  reninciation (nekkhamma):

Pāramī means that which enables one to go to the Further Shore.

Pāramī are those virtues which are cultivated with compassion, guided by reason, uninfluenced by selfish motives and unsullied by misbelief and all feelings of self-conceit.

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The Buddha’s Daily Routine Print E-mail

Introduction

Narada Maha Thera in The Buddha and His Teachings (1998) outlines the Buddha's daily routine:

The Buddha can be considered the most energetic and active of all religious teachers that ever lived. The whole day He was occupied with religious activities except when attending to His physical needs.

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