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The Factor of Keen Investigation Print E-mail

Introduction

Piyadassi Maha Thera, (1960) in The Seven Factors of Enlightenment, translates from the Pali and explains what the Buddha said about the enlightenmant factor of keen Investigation:

The second enlightenment factor is 'dhammavicaya,' keen investigation of the Dhamma. It is the sharp analytical knowledge of understanding the true nature of all constituent things, animate or inanimate, human or divine. It is seeing things as they really are; seeing things in their proper perspective. It is the analysis of all component things into their fundamental elements, right down to their ultimates.

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About Nibbāna Print E-mail

Introduction

Narada Maha Thera in The Buddha and His Teachings (1998) translates and narrates what the Buddha said about the characteristics of Nibbāna:

“What is Nibbāna, friend? The destruction of lust, the destruction of
hatred, the destruction of delusion – that, Friend, is called Nibbāna.”

Samyutta Nikāya

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Is Buddhism a Religion? Print E-mail

Introduction

Narada  Maha  Thera  in  The Buddha and His Teachings  (1998) addresses the question of whether Buddhism is a religion:

The Venerable Narada Maha Thera begins by quoting Prof. Rhys Davids who asks the question:

“What is meant by religion? The word, as is well-known is not found in languages not related to our own, and its derivation is uncertain. Cicero, in one passage, derived it from re and lego, and held that its real meaning was the repetition of prayers and incantations. Another interpretation derives the word from re and logo, and makes its original sense that of attachment, of a continual binding (that is, no doubt to the gods). A third derivation connects the word with lex, and explains it as a law-abiding, scrupulously conscientious frame of mind.”  (Narada 210)

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The Fire Sermon Print E-mail
Written by David Holmes (Anagarika Tevijjo)   

Introduction

It is often good to start off with a story as a way of getting into the topic:

Conversion of Kassapa, the Fire-Worshiper

“At that time there lived in Uruvela the Jatilas, Brahman hermits with matted-hair, worshiping the fire and keeping a fire-dragon; and Kassapa was their chief.                           (<www.sacred texts.com>)
Kassapa was renowned throughout all India, and his name was honored as one of the wisest men on earth and an authority on religion.
And the Blessed One went to Kassapa of Uruvela the Jatila, and said:
"Let me stay a night in the room where you keep your sacred fire."
 
Worn-out Skin Print E-mail

Introduction

The Sutta Nipata, in its oldest and most characteristic parts, is a deeply stirring Song of Freedom. The verses of this ancient book are a challenging call to us to leave behind the narrow confines of our imprisoned existence with its ever-growing walls of accumulated habits of life and thought.

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