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Anuruddha: Master of the Divine Eye Print E-mail

Introduction

The Buddha’s father, King Suddhodana, had a brother, the prince Amitodana, who had five children. Among them was Ānanda, who was later to be the Buddha’s faithful attendant, and Mahānāma, heir to the Sakyan throne. A third brother was Anuruddha. Anuruddha briefly tells of his youth:

Then was I born within the Sakyan clan, As Anuruddha known; by dance and song Attended and by clang of cymbals waked.

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Maha-Moggallana Print E-mail

Introduction

Near the capital of the kingdom of Magadha (today in the Indian State of Bihar) there were several townships. In one of them, Kolita Moggallana was born in a Brahmanic family which claimed descent from Mudgala, one of the ancient seers. Thus this clan was named "the Moggallans." The small town was inhabited entirely by Brahmans and was "ultra-conservative." Kolita's father was born of the most prominent family from which usually the town's mayor was appointed. Being a member of such a high caste and of the town's most respected family, his father was almost like a petty king. Thus Kolita grew up in an environment of wealth and honor, knowing of no sorrows. He was educated entirely in the Brahmanic tradition which was based on the law of the seeds and ripening of actions. As a matter of course, that education included the belief in a life beyond, making it part and parcel of every-day life and its rituals.

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Buddhist Women at the Time of The Buddha Print E-mail

Introduction

At the time of the Buddha, a daughter was born to the foreman of the guild of garland-makers in Savatthi. She was beautiful, clever and well behaved and a source of joy to her father.

One day, when she had just turned sixteen, she went to the public flower gardens with her girl-friends and took three portions of fermented rice along in her basket as the day's sustenance.

When she was just leaving by the city gate, a group of monks came along, who had come down from the monastery on the hill to obtain almsfood in town. The leader among them stood out; one whose grandeur and sublime beauty impressed her so much, that she impulsively offered him all the food in her basket.

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Angulimala: A Murderer's Road to Sainthood Print E-mail

Introduction

Angulimala, the robber and murderer, is one of the best known figures of the Buddhist scriptures, because of his dramatic life story.

His conversion to monkhood and later to sainthood was exceptional as he seems to have been the only former criminal to be accepted into the Buddhist monastic order.

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Anathapindika Print E-mail

Introduction

Thus have I heard: One time the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi in the Jeta Grove, in Anathapindika's Monastery..." Numerous discourses of the Buddha begin with these words, and hence the name of that great lay devotee, Anathapindika is well known.

His name means: "One who gives alms (pinda) to the unprotected (a-natha)" and is the honorific of the householder Sudatta of the city of Savatthi. Who was he? How did he meet the Buddha? What was his relationship to the teaching? The answers to these questions may be found in the many references to him which occur in the traditional texts.

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