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A Treatise on the Paramis Print E-mail

Introduction

In its earliest phase, as represented by the four main collections of the Sutta Pi†aka, the focal concern of Buddhism was the attainment of nibbåna by the practice of the Noble Eightfold Path. In these collections the Buddha teaches his doctrine as a direct path to deliverance, and perhaps no feature of the presentation is so striking as the urgency he enjoins on his disciples in bringing their spiritual work to completion by reaching the final goal. Just as a man who discovers his turban to be in flames would immediately seek to extinguish it, so should the earnest disciple strive to extinguish the flames of craving in order to reach the state of security, the consummate peace of nibbåna.

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Wisdom Develops Samādhi Print E-mail

Introduction

This book ‘Wisdom Develops Samādhi’ is one of the few books written by Ācariya Mahā Boowa (Bhikkhu Ñāṇasampanno) who is now the abbot of Baan Taad Forest Monastery, which is situated in the country-side close to the village where he was born and brought up. When he was old enough he ordained as a monk and some while afterwards he went away to find a meditation teacher. He was directed towards the Vener-able Ācariya Mun (Bhūridatta Thera) and Ācariya Mahā Boowa has said that as soon he met Ācariya Mun, he knew that Ācariya Mun was his teacher. He learnt and practised under the guidance of Ācariya Mun for nine years until Ācariya Mun died at the age of eighty years, after which Ācariya Mahā Boowa practised the way on his own in the hills and forests of Thailand. He then wandered throughout the country, going to nearly every province until he was offered land by supporters near his home village to build a forest monastery. Since then, he settled down and has lived there since.

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Kamma and Its Fruit Print E-mail

Introduction

Kamma—or in its Sanskrit form, karma—is the Buddhist conception of action as a force which shapes and transforms human destiny. Often misunderstood as an occult power or as an inescapable fate, kamma as taught by the Buddha is in actuality nothing other than our own will or volition coming to expression in concrete action. The Buddhist doctrine of kamma thus places ultimate responsibility for human destiny in our own hands. It reveals to us how our ethical choices and actions can become either a cause of pain and bondage or a means to spiritual freedom.

In this book, five practising Buddhists, all with modern backgrounds, offer their reflections on the significance of kamma and its relations to ethics, spiritual practise, and philosophical understanding.

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Looking Inward Print E-mail

Introduction

Those who practice the Dhamma should train themselves to understand in the following stages:

The training that is easy to learn, gives immediate results, and is suitable for every time, every place, for people of every age and either sex, is to study in the school of this body — a fathom long, a cubit wide, and a span thick — with its perceiving mind in charge. This body has many things, ranging from the crude to the subtle, that are well worth knowing.

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The Buddhist Monk’s Discipline Print E-mail

Introduction

The teachings given by Lord Buddha which are preserved and practiced to the present day, are known in the ancient texts as the Dhamma-Vinaya. Although there is a great loss of meaning when translating these two terms into English, they may be rendered as Doctrine and aspects of Discipline. Numerous books are given over to explaining aspects of Dhamma but perhaps because of its monastic meaning the Vinaya seems neglected and not given due prominence. It will be the task of this booklet to examine Vinaya from a particular point of view—that of the Buddhist layman and how a knowledge of some of its rules can be useful to him.

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