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A
Mahāsi Sayādaw
A Discourse on Dependent Origination
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Dependent Origination means, "When this happens that happens." This means all causes have effects -- all actions have results. So the Buddha, before his enlightment, applied this formula to the cause of aging, sickness and death,  and etc., and he saw that and all feelings have causes and results, All actions have a cause and an effect, and as all causes have effects, we reap the results of our actions, and this is a good reason to intend good actions to get good results in this life and the next..

 
 
Mahāsi Sayādaw
A Discourse on the Wheel of the Dhamma
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This was the first discourse of the Buddha when he decided to teach the Dhamma and then addressed the five ascetics, in the deer park, whom he thought would understand what he had discovered about suffering in the world, the cause of worldly suffering, and the way to become free of suffering by following the Noble Eightfold Path.

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera
Abhidhamma Studies
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The Abhidhamma is impressive as an analysis of the entire realm of consciousness without any reference to worldly terminology or conventions, lacking any reference to ontology or mythology. The Abhidhamma is a systematization of the whole of reality as far as it of concern to man's liberation from passion and suffering. 

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera and Bhikkhu Bodhi
Anguttara Nikaya Part I
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The Aṅguttara Nikāya is the largest among the four collections (nikāya) of the Buddha’s Discourses contained in the Sutta Piṭaka of the Pali Canon. The title of the work derives from the way of its arrangement. The Book of the Ones (Ekaka Nipāta) comprises items with single classification; the Book of the Twos (Duka Nipāta), items with a twofold classification and so forth up to the Book of the Elevens, The Pali title, Aṅguttara Nikāya, could be rendered literally by “Further-factored Collection” (aṅga factor, uttara, beyond, further), i.e., “discourses in progressive numerical order.” In the Pali Text Society’s translation of the complete work, it is called Gradual Sayings. It is characteristic of this discourse collection that it mainly deals with the practical aspects of Buddhism; ethics (lay and monastic), mind training (meditation) and the community life of monks. Philosophical texts, however, are not absent entirely, as extracts in the present anthology show. The present volume contains selections from the first four Books.

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera and Bhikkhu Bodhi
Anguttara Nikaya Part II
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The Aṅguttara Nikāya is the largest among the four collections (nikāya) of the Buddha’s Discourses contained in the Sutta Piṭaka of the Pali Canon. The title of the work derives from the way of its arrangement. The Book of the Ones (Ekaka Nipāta) comprises items with single classification; the Book of the Twos (Duka Nipāta), items with a twofold classification and so forth up to the Book of the Elevens, The Pali title, Aṅguttara Nikāya, could be rendered literally by “Further-factored Collection” (aṅga factor, uttara, beyond, further), i.e., “discourses in progressive numerical order.” In the Pali Text Society’s translation of the complete work, it is called Gradual Sayings. It is characteristic of this discourse collection that it mainly deals with the practical aspects of Buddhism; ethics (lay and monastic), mind training (meditation) and the community life of monks. Philosophical texts, however, are not absent entirely, as extracts in the present anthology show. 

 
 
Piyadassi Maha Thera
Aspects Of Buddhism
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“Early Buddhism emphasises the importance of the scientific outlook in dealing with the problems of morality and religion. Its specific ’dogmas’ are said to be capable of verification. And its general account of the nature of man and the universe is one that accords with the findings of science rather than being at variance with them. 

 
 
B
Mem Tin Mon Dr.
Buddha Abhidamma Ultimate Science
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NATURAL SCIENCES investigate the basic principles and laws of nature to explain the physical phenomena that have been occurring for aeons. But they cannot probe the nature of the mind and they fail to explain the mental phenomena that have enormous influence on physical phenomena. Lord Buddha, with His power of omniscience, knew the true nature of the mind and correctly described the causal relations that govern mind and matter and thus can explain all psycho-physical phenomena in the world. His ultimate teaching, known as Abhidhamma, describes in detail the natures of the ultimate realities that really exist in nature but are unknown to scientists

 
 
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
Buddhadama for University students
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BUDDHA-DHAMMA FOR STUDENTS was the result of two talks given by Ajahn Buddhadāsa, in January 1966, to students at Thammasat University, Bangkok. Then and in the years since, many young Thais had been returning to Buddhism in search of answers and possibilities not provided by their increasingly western-oriented education, so Buddhadasa goes back to the basics of Buddhist teaching and explains what it is all about. . 

 
 
Soma Thera
Buddhas-Teaching--Clear-&-Practical Message
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The Buddha’s message consists of the doctrine (dhamma) and discipline (vinaya). The discipline has to do with conduct, virtue and morals—the ethical side of the message—and the doctrine with the rest. In the threefold division of the path to happiness, produced by the destruction of craving, the discipline comes under the aggregate of virtue (sīla), and the doctrine belongs to the aggregates of concentration (samādhi) and wisdom (paññā). The discipline concerns the activity of speech and bodily behaviour; the doctrine is connected with the activities of the intellect and with understanding. 

 
 
Story, Francis
Buddhist Meditation
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There is an essential difference between Buddhist Meditation and that practiced in other world systems which put different emphases on different things. In Buddhism there are two root causes which must be addressed, and they are ignorance (avijja) and desire (thanha) which form a viscious circle, when due to ignorance, desire cannot be satisfied. So in Buddhist meditation, we contemplate the root causes of mental dissatisfaction in order to to get rid of them, and this practice leads to satisfaction..

 
 
D
Dhammika, Bhante S.
Daily Readings from the Words of the Buddha
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Bhante Dhammika has chosen and organized significant extracts from the Word of the Buddha suitable for pondering upon daily in gradual development towards liberation from craving and woldly ways on the path leading to eventual enlightenment. 

 
 
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
Dhammic Socialism
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"Dhammic socialism" can also be translated a "Buddhist Socialism" representing egalitarian ideals of the production and distribution of wealth, and since Buddhadasa Bhikkhu felt  that all persons should be treated equally and with goodness, the way the Buddha taught, this had obvious implications for his vision of what Thai society should be like.

 
 
Story, Francis
Dimensions of Buddhist Thought
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Francis Story shares some of his writings, firstly, on the uniqueness and beauty of Buddhism and the Buddhist world view in the age of science; followed, secondly, by observations on the origin of life and  the omniscience of the Buddha; and then, thirdly, completed by thoughts on the Dhamma from the author's notebooks.

 
 
Wanrut, Somdet Phra
Discourses in Brief: Sankhitt ovad
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Somdet Phra Wanrut (Tup Buddhasiri) was born in 1806 in the area of the newly established capital of Bangkok, at that time situated on the western side of the Chao Phraya River in Thonburi, during the reign of the first King of the present dynasty (called in Thai the ‘Ratanakosin’ Era). As a young boy, he was so brilliant in his studies that he started receiving royal patronage. He began studying Pāli as a boy even before he ordained as a novice. As a gifted scholar while still a teenager, he was introduced to Prince Mongkut and became his friend and tutor. At the age of twenty, he ordained as a monk as did Prince Mongkut. After a few years, they became uninspired by the state of the monkhood in Siam. Coming across Mon monks of the Rāmaṇa Nikāya who were strict and faithful in their practise of the monks’ monastic code, they reordained. Together with a strong interest in studying the original teachings of the Buddha in the Pāli scriptures, this germinal act blossomed into a full-on reform movement in Thai Buddhism – the Dhammayuttika Nikāya.

 
 
E
Karunadasa, Dr.Y.
Early Buddhist Teachings
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The early Buddhist discourses often refer to the mutual opposition between two views. One is the view of permanence or eternalism (sassatavada). The other is the view of annihilation (ucchedavada). The former is sometimes referred to as bhava-ditthi, the belief in being, and the latter as vibhava-ditthi, the belief in non-being. The world at large has a general tendency to lean upon one of these two views. Thus, addressing Kaccayana, the Buddha says: 'This world, O Kaccayana, generally proceeds on a duality, of (the belief in) existence and (the belief in) non-existence.' What interests us here is the fact that it is against these two views that Buddhist polemics are continually directed. What is more, all the fundamental doctrines of early Buddhism are presented in such a way as to unfold themselves, or to follow as a logical sequence, from a sustained criticism of sassatavada and ucchedavada. This particular context is sometimes explicitly stated; at other times it is taken for granted. Therefore, it is within the framework of the Buddhist critique of sassatavada and ucchedavada that the Buddhist doctrines seem to assume their significance. For it is through the demolition of these two world-views that Buddhism seeks to construct its own world-view. The conclusion is that it was as a critical response to the mutual opposition between these two views that Buddhism emerged as a new faith amidst many other faiths.

 
 
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
Extinction Without Remainder
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Extinction without remainder  is approached in two ways: In one method, one should habitually strive for the extinction without remainder of the attachment of what is felt as ’This is I’ and ’This is mine’. In the other method, when the body is about to break up, one should let go of everything, including body, life and mind.

 
 
F
Maha Boowa
Forest Dhamma
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FOREST DHAMMA us a Selection of Talks on Buddhist Practice by Venerable Ãcariya Mahã Boowa Ñãõasampanno translated by: Venerable Ãcariya Paññãvaððho.

 
 
Santina, Peter Della
Fundamentals of Buddhism
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We are going to cover twelve lectures including, under others, the life of the Buddha, the four noble thrths, the noble eightfold path; kamma, rebirth, dependent origination, the three chsracteristics and the five aggregates. We will present a systematic buildup, in the same way the Buddha taught a gradual development,

 
 
H
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
Handbook for Mankind
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Buddhadasa Bhikkhu taught not so much about how to study the texts as he did about how we should live our lives. The author  offers timeless insights into the teachings of the Buddha and how they will be benneficial for everybody in society, worldwide, regardless of their religious or cultural background.

 
 
Silananda, Sayadaw U
Handbook of Abhidhamma Studies
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The Abhidhammatthasangaha ṅ is a small book that was probably written by an Indian monk named Ācariya Anuruddha in about the twelfth century. That small book provides an introduction to subjects taught in the Abhidhamma texts of the Tipi aka. Actually in order to understand the Abhidhamma ṭ texts in the Pā i Canon, it is essential that the ḷ Abhidhammatthasa gaha ṅ be thoroughly mastered.

 
 
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
Heart-wood of the Bodhi Tree
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The Bodhi Tree is the nickname of the species of tree under which each Buddha awakened to suññatā. Each Buddha had a particular Bodhi tree. The Buddha of the present eaon, Gotama, realized perfect awakening under a member of the ficus family, which, due to its association with Buddhism, has been given the scientific name ficus religiosa. In India, it is now known as the pipal tree. In Thailand, this tree and its close relatives are all known as poh trees. Ajahn Buddhadāsa pointed out that all members of the ficus family lack “heartwood” or the hard inner pith found in most trees. The heartwood of the Bodhi tree is truly void. This is the emptiness which the Buddha understood. 

 
 
I
Jootla, Susan E.
Inspiration by Enlightened Nuns
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In this booklet we will be exploring poems composed by the Arahat bhikkhunīs or enlightened Buddhist nuns of old, looking at these poems as springs of inspiration for contemporary Buddhists. Most of the poems we will consider come from the Therīgāthā, a small section of the vast Pali Canon.

 
 
K
Lee Dhammadharo, Ajahn
Keeping the Breath in Mind
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This is a basic "how to" book, which teaches the liberation of the mind, not in theory but rather in practice, as a skill which is based upon keeping the breath in mind. Ahahn Lee was one of Thailand's most renowned masters and teachers of forest tradition meditation skills and benefits, whose practice grew based uopn personal development and experience.

 
 
L
Thynn Thynn, Dr.
Living Meditation, Living Insight
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After many years of teaching the Dhamma, to her group, Dr. Thynn Thynn was inspired to write a bood about the questions and discussions that came out of  working with her students. As she wrote, she also gave copies to her practitioners to help them on their way and encourage them in their quest.

 
 
M
Ledi Sayadaw
Manual of Insight Vipassana Dipani
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First, we must be rid of delusions, sometimes translated as hallucinations of perception, hallucunations of thought, and hallucination of views. We must understand how to get rid of the delusion of permanence, the delusion of what is impure as pure, the delision of suffering as happiness and the delusion of no-self as being self. We must get rid of the delusions: this is "me," this is "mine," this is "myself" ...

 
 
Ledi Sayadaw
Manual of Mindfulness of Breathing
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If one does not have mindfulness of breathing under control, one cannot go on to mindfulness of  tranquility, and if one can not maintain tranquility, one cannot go on towards the achievement of nibbana, so our first focus should be on mindfulness of breathing.

 
 
N
Santina, Peter Della
Nagarjuna on Causality and Emptiness
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 In the past twenty five years, many books have appeared, focussed on the topics of Nagarjuna and causality and emptiness. It could, indeed, be said that, especially in recent times, Nagarjuna has become a favorite subject for scholars from many fields both within and without Buddhist Studies. 

 
 
Burns, Douglas M.
Nirvana, Nihilism and Satori
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To understand the word Nirvāna, one must be acquainted with the other major tenets of Buddhism. For on a conceptual level (but not on an experiential level), Nirvāna is an important part of a well-integrated philosophical system. Thus, to begin our discussion of Nirvāna let us first speak of its antithesis, saṃsāra, the so-called “world of becoming.” In Buddhism the word saṃsāra designates the entire universe of physical and psychological existence: time, space, matter, thought, emotion, volition, perception, karma, and so forth. 

 
 
Silananda, Sayadaw U
No Inner Core
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The no-self doctrine (anatta) is what makes Buddhism different fron other religions and perhaps one of the most misunderstood ideas in the Dhamma, but Sayadaw U Silananda, who was chosen by Mahasi Sayadaw to teach Buddhist doctrines in America, explains the anatta doctrine in the way the Buddha meant it to be understood

 
 
P
Ashby, Elizabeth
Pride and Conceit
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If one regards himself superior or equal or inferior by reason of the body that is impermanent, painful and subject to change, what else is it than not seeing reality? Or if one regards himself superior or equal or inferior by reason of feelings, perceptions, volitions or consciousness, what else is it than not seeing reality? If one does not regard himself superior or equal or inferior by reason of the body, the feelings, perceptions, volitions or consciousness, what else is it than seeing reality? — SN 22:49

 
 
R
Fa-Hien A Chinese Monk who travelled in India from A.D.399-414
Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms
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This is a translation of the travels of the Chinese Monk, Fa Hien, who undertook to walk from China to India on foot to seek out and hear the teachings on the discipline of the Buddha. This was an important early record  at a time when extant Chinese documents were already somewhat mutilated and dilapitated.

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera
Roots of Good and Evil
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The Buddha taught that there are three roots of  evil which are: greed, hatred and delusion. These are the three states which comprise the entire range of evil, whether of greater or lesser intensity, leading from faint tendencies, to the coarsest of manifestations. So it would be good if we as practioners  could become aware of how these roots affect our reactions and intentions and actions in order to allow us to cut them out before they are able to do any unnecessary damage.  

 
 
S
Story, Francis
Samsara and the Way of Dispassion
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Francis Story, a prolific author, wrote many books for the Buddhist Publication Society under thr editorship of venerable Nyanaponika, and in the present text, he shares two useful essays. The first is about Samsara, the worldly world, of worldly ways and wants, and the second follows by describing how man loses his interest in and becomes dispassionate about worldly things when he chooses to cultivate and develop highrer and purer phenomena.

 
 
Nanajivako, Bhikkhu
Schopnhauer and Buddhism
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Schopenhauer, after dealing with the philosophy of Kant and Hegel and other contemporaries, turned to eastern philosophy, in particular from translations into Latin of Faussbhuel, and rather than depending on western epistemology and metaphysics, turned to the Buddha and the idea of the will or volition to explain how we view the world and how we deal with suffering. He was way ahead of his time, but little understood, living an isolated life in Frankfurt, although in later years, he was somewhat better accepted and still later, following his death, was read and appreciated by a much wider audience.

 
 
Maha Boowa
Six Talks on the Dhamma: Amata Dhamma
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Translated by Ajaan Suchard Sujato as Six Talks on Dhamma, Five of the talks in this book were given for the benefit of Mrs. Pow-panga Vathanakul, who began staying at Wat Pa Baan Taad in early November 1975. The other talk, “The Middle Way of Practice”, was given to an assembly of bhikkhus in 1962. It was a talk which Mrs. Pow-panga found especially useful. Before arriving at Wat Pa Baan Taad, she had just been released from the hospital where she was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Although she was given only six months to live, she, in fact, lived another eleven months, largely due to the spiritual strength she gained through the practice of meditation and the help she received in Dhamma. During the four-month period she lived at Wat Pa Baan Taad, Ãcariya Mahã Boowa gave her about 130 talks on Dhamma.

 
 
T
Jootla, Susan E.
Teacher of the Devas
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In the canonical formula for contemplation of the Buddha, nine epithets of the Awakened One are mentioned. One of these, likely to be overlooked, is satthā devamanussānaṃ, “teacher of gods and humans.” The present essay focuses on one aspect of this epithet: the Buddha’s role as teacher of the devas or gods. In the pages to follow we will carefully consider the instructions and techniques he used when teaching beings of divine stature. If we study these teachings we will gain deeper understanding of how we should purify our own minds, and by studying the responses of the gods we can find models for our own behaviour in relation to the Master and his teaching. 

 
 
Kabilsingh,Chatsumarn
The Bhikkhuni Patimokka
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This is a complete translation of the Bhikkhuni Patimokka by Professor Chatsumarn Kabilsing, who later ordained and became the famous and well-respected Theravada Nun, Dhammananda Bhikkhuni  who now leads a monestary  of well-trained Bhikkhunis in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand and who travels world-wide teaching the Dhamma.

 
 
Mahāsi Sayādaw
The Brahmavihara
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Mahasi Sayadaw expounds a discourse on developing the Four Divine Abodes: of loving-kindness, compassion, sympatheteic joy and equanimity as a positive way of acting with care and understsnding towarsds  all beings.We learn how the Buddha used these wholesome skills  for the benefit, weal and welfare of both humans and all other living beings, concentrating the mind on positive states rather than their opposites.

 
 
Piyadassi Maha Thera
The Buddha, His Life and Teaching
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The Buddha lived over 2,500 years ago, and was known  as Siddattha Gotoma and His father ruled over the Land of the Sakayans. Mahamaya the princess was his queen ....

 
 
de Silva, Lily
The Buddhist Attitude Towards Nature
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The current crisis arising over environmental pollution and the over-exploitation of our natural resources has gripped the attention and aroused the concern of virtually every human being alive today. The anxiety provoked by the 5 “ecocrisis” stems from a cause lying far deeper than the immediate predicament which it creates. For the ecocrisis does not confront us simply as one more set of problems to be disposed of through further research and legislation. It comes upon us, rather, as a disturbing manifestation of the dangers inherent in unbridled technological proliferation and industrial growth and a grim portent of even graver dangers ahead if current trends continue unchecked. Thereby it causes us to reassess some of the basic premises upon which modern Western civilization is grounded and the goals towards which so much of our energy and wealth are directed. 

 
 
Soma Thera
The Buddhist Code of Discipline
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The Buddha’s message consists of the Doctrine (Dhamma) and the Discipline (Vinaya). The Discipline has to do with conduct, virtue, morals, the ethical side of the message; the Doctrine with the rest. In the threefold division of the Noble Eightfold Path, the Discipline comes under the aggregates of virtue (sīla); the Doctrine belongs to the aggregates of concentration (samādhi) and wisdom (paññā). The Discipline concerns the activity of speech and bodily behaviour; the Doctrine is connected with the activities of the intellect and of the understanding.

 
 
Punnadhammo MahaThera
The Buddhist Cosmos: A Comprehensive Study
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The purpose of this book is to present a comprehensive description of the universe and its inhabitants as they were understood by the Buddhists of ancient India. This is the context within which the teachings of the Buddha were situated. The material in this book should be of interest to both Buddhists and to students of myth and folklore. For the modern Buddhist, especially in the Western countries outside the historical range of the religion, the material in this book will hopefully fill a gap in her knowledge. The understanding of this background should make the experience of reading the suttas richer and more meaningful. This is the imaginative space in which all Buddhists lived until very recently, and even if it is no longer held literally in all details, this cosmology and mythology is still very much a living tradition in Buddhist countries today. 

 
 
Story, Francis and Venerable Dr. Parawahera Vajirañāṇa Thera
The Buddhist Doctrine of Nibbana
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The ultimate goal of Buddhism is the attainment of nibbana, but many people are unsure about what nibbana is. One view, which is wrong, is that nibbana is eternal life. The opposite view is that  is that nibbana is annihilaton, but that is a false idea too. Nibbana is better termed in negative words "like a flame which has gone out," but that needs to be better explained

 
 
Story, Francis
The Case for Rebirth
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The doctrine of rebirth, the ceaseless round of being reborn, is not confined to Buddhism and Hinduism. It is found in some form in many other ancient religions and philosophical systems in many parts of the world, In recent times, interest in rebirth has been greatly stimulated by several cases of people who have remembered previous lives, whereby inducing a state of hypnosis has allowed a therapist to get the subject  to go back in time and speak about experiences in past lives.

 
 
Karunadasa, Dr.Y.
The Dhamma Theory
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During the first two centuries following the Buddha’s parinibbāna there took place, within the early Buddhist community, a move towards a comprehensive and precise systematisation of the teachings disclosed by the Master in his discourses. The philosophical systems that emerged from this refined analytical approach to the doctrine are collectively called the Abhidhamma. Both the Theravāda and the Sarvāstivāda, the two major conservative schools in the early Sangha, had their own Abhidhammas, each based on a distinct Abhidhamma Piṭaka. It is likely too that other schools had also developed philosophical systems along similar lines, though records of them did not survive the 6 passage of time.

 
 
Soma Thera
The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta
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For seven weeks after his enlightenment, the Buddha, staying near the Bodhi Tree, thought over the implications of the discovery he had made, and its bearing upon the destiny of beings. He had seen life truly as it is; that is, as an arising and a passing away; he knew that when there is an arising, there is only the arising of ill, and when there is a ceasing, only a ceasing of ill. His compassion urged him to pass this knowledge on to the world for the benefit of living beings. So, after much thought upon the way of presenting the doctrine to the world, he decided to seek out his 3 old companions in struggle, the group of five ascetics, Koṇḍañña, Bhaddiya, Vappa, Mahānāma, and Assaji, who, next to two great teachers, Ālāra Kālāma and Uddaka Rāmaputta, now dead, had been of greatest assistance to him in his quest.These five were then staying at Isipatana, the Sages’ Resort, in the deer park near Benares, and the Buddha went there to preaent his first sermon. 

 
 
Webu Sayadaw
The Essential Practice Part I
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You have taken up moral conduct (sīla). Now that you have undertaken to perfect yourselves in the perfection of morality (sīlapāramī), fulfil it to the utmost. Only if you fulfil sīla to the utmost will all your aspirations be met. You will be happy now and in the future. Only the teachings of the Buddha can give you real happiness—in the present and in the remainder of saṃsāra. 

 
 
Webu Sayadaw
The Essential Practice Part II
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While we are fulfilling our duties, is it not possible to practise mindfulness of breathing too? If we do not fulfil these duties, can we say that our sīla is complete? If our sīla is not perfect, can we expect to experience the happiness we aspire for? If we are not happy, if we can’t get good concentration, and if our mind is not concentrated, we can’t attain insight wisdom (paññā). 

 
 
Bodhi, Bhikkhu
The Fruits of Recluseship
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This is another one of Bhikkhu Bodhi's long translations whcih will perhaps be of special interest to those who are thinking of ordaining and may want to know the benefits of practicing the teaching as  the Buddha outlined it for those members of the Sangha who want to know more details about following the Noblepath right to the end.

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera
The Fundamentals of Buddhism
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Venerable Nyanaponika  shares four lectures on: 

(1) The Essence of Buddhism,

(2) Kamma and Rebirth,

(3) Dependent Origination, and

(4) Mental Culture.

 
 
Dteu, Luang Pu
The Heart of Buddhism
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Luang Pu Dteu was one of the first-generation disciples of Luang Pu Mun, remaining as a monk in the Mahā-Nikāya sect for many years. Following Luang Pu Mun up into the north of Thailand (as he became Luang Pu Mun's most trusted disciple), he re-ordained in the Dhammayut sect after 19 years in the monkhood, taking Tan Chao Khun Upālī Guṇūpamājaan as his preceptor at Wat Chedi Luang in Chiang Mai. Two notable things about Luang Pu Dteu's character were that he was utterly eccentric and unconventional, and that he was completely fearless. He had a strange affinity with wild tigers, who could often be found wherever he stayed, ostensibly looking out for him. His life story is arguably the most entertaining of any of the great forest ajaans – chock full of incredible incidents, often involving psychic powers or miraculous events. Beneath all these externals though, were great accomplishments in Dhamma. He was widely regarded as an arahant possessed of all the psychic powers and analytical knowledges that can be attained.

 
 
Nyanatiloka Mahā Thera
The Influence of Buddhism on a People
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This is the transcript of a talk which Venerable Nyanatiloka gave in Sri Lanka around mid-20th century about the influence that the example and the teachings of the Buddha can have on the culture and way of life of a people -- which, of course, aslo applies to others around the world who follow the Buddha in the present day.

 
 
Soma Thera and Piyadassi Thera
The Lamp of the law
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 Dharmapradīpikā, which may aptly be translated as Lamp (pradīpikā) of the Law (Dharma), is a sort of commentary on the Mahābodhivaṃsa, the “Chronicle of the Tree of Enlightenment’, written in Pāli by that erudite author, Upatissa Mahā Thera. Judging from the style of language it can be said that the Dharmapradīpikā was written either toward the end of 12th century A. C. or beginning of the 13th century. As our author himself says in his other work, Amāvatura, the “Perennial Spring’, Dharmapradīpikā is a work dealing with the doctrine (Dhamma) of the Buddha while Amāvatura 4 speaks of the life of the Buddha. 

 
 
Waen, Luang Pu
The Life and Teachings of Luang Pu Waen Succino
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“Luang Pu Waen never talked about superior states of human attainment. He said that whoever talked about superior states of human attainment was only interested in gain, praise and fame! He said that whoever was interested in laypeople was only interested in gain, praise and fame. Luang Pu Waen wasn’t interested in laypeople. When laypeople came, he would just go into his kuṭi and lie down on the floor with his legs in the air! Whenever monks would come or go, Luang Pu Waen wasn’t interested in monks. Luang Pu Waen wasn’t interested in novices. Luang Pu Waen wasn’t interested in nuns. Luang Pu Waen had one special, defining characteristic: he was only interested in one thing – Dhamma-Vinaya.”

 
 
Upali, Chao Khun
The Natural Character of Awakening
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Tan Chao Khun Upali Gunupamajahn (1856-1932) was something of an anomaly as a monk. Equally at home chatting about administration with ecclesiastical monks in the great halls of Bangkok, teaching Pæli or points of doctrine at the Royal Palace lecture-grounds, or discussing ascetic wandering and meditation in the wild upcountry forests with Luang Pu Mun, he seemed to be accomplished at everything. Luang Pu Mun would often tell his disciples “Chao Khun Upælø is an expert practitioner, he’s an expert scholar; he’s the scriptural model of a monk”. Tan Chao Khun Upælø devised and established the monastic education system in Ubon Ratchathani that would give a solid grounding in the Buddha’s teachings to dozens of Thailand’s greatest forest Ajahns. He was so respected that Luang Pu Mun actually accepted a one-year period as abbot of the most important city temple in Chiang Mai out of deference to his request. Tan Chao Khun Upælø had many connections with Luang Pu Mun. 

 
 
Buddhadasa Bhikkhu
The Natural Cure for Spiritual Disease
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The Buddha-Damma is as vast as the universe and as concise as a flash of insight. and many sentient beings have got lost in between the two. Fundamental perspectives are required for us to begin sorting out and understanding the multiplicity of experiences and cosmic concepts. The present work offers a clear, direct and practical guide into the essantials  and fundamentals  of nature and the law of nature.

 
 
Maha Boowa
The Path to Arahatship
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A Compilation of Venerable Ācariya Mahā Boowa’s Dhamma Talks About His Path of Practice Translated by Bhikkhu Sīlaratano.

 
 
Piyadassi Maha Thera
The Seven Factors of Enlightenment
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The seven factors are: 1. Mindfulness (sati), 2. Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya), [3] 3. Energy (viriya), 4. Rapture or happiness (pīti), 5. Calm (passaddhi), 6. Concentration (samādhi), 7. Equanimity (upekkhā).

 
 
Piyadassi Maha Thera
The Story of Mahinda
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“Go forth, my brethren, for the gain of many, for the welfare of many, out of compassion for the world.” In these words the Buddha, gave a message to the first sixty Arahants, and through them, to the Sangha for all time. This mandate was fully carried out for centuries, and in obedience to it, the Arahant Mahinda came to Lanka. On being asked by King Tissa who they were, the Arahant replied “Samaóas are we, Oh King, Disciples of the King of Truth. Out of compassion for thee have we come from Jambudìpa.” The message he brought was the message of the Buddha Dhamma, the way to the attainment of happiness here and now and in the hereafter; from happiness which is transient, to the “Highest Happiness” the incomparable security of “Nibbána.” Mahinda’s work was twofold; one was to teach the “way to Happiness” and the other was the organisation of a national Sangha, which was to maintain by practice and by teaching, the message of the Dhamma. 

 
 
Story, Francis
The Supreme Conqueror
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From time to time, in the course of aeons, a being by his own efforts penetrates the thick veil of ignorance -- in which there is no stability, in which there is no peace or security --  From time to time, a supreme being penetrates the thick veil of ignorance and then teaches mankind the ultimate way to peace, which involves cessation from becoming, the achievement of equilibrium, leading to fulfillment. This person is destined to become a Buddha  -- a supreme warrior -- a supreme conqueror.

 
 
Piyadassi Maha Thera
The Threefold Division of the Noble Eightfold Path
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The Buddha's gradual teaching follows a progression from the establishment of (1). morality (2) to mental concentrtion and (3) to the development of wisdom. These three: virtue, concentration and wisdom are the cardinal teachings of the Buddha  and must be properly understood before we begin a gradual process of development which leads from darkness to light, from passion to dispassion, from turmoil to tranquility.

 
 
Nyanaponika Maha Thera
The Threefold Refuge
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When we as Buddhists, ordain and seek refuge in the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha, we go to the Buddha to follow his example; we go to the Dhamma to learn to understand the laws of nature and the workings of man's mind within the cosmos; and we go to the Sangha, the monastic community, in order to be guided and protected as we gradually make our way along the path to liberation and nibbana.,

 
 
Pandita, Sayādaw U
Timeless Wisdom: Teachings on SatipatthaVipasana
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To realize the Dhamma one should know how to practice and strive toward discerning the Four Noble Truths which include: the truth of dukkha (dukkha sacca), the truth of the origin of dukkha (dukkha samudaya sacca), the truth of the cessation of dukkha (dukkha nirodha sacca) and the truth of the path leading to the cessation of dukkha (magga sacca). The First Noble Truth (dukkha sacca) is that the whole body is one mass of dukkha. All actions, be it sitting, touching, feeling, seeing, hearing, smelling, standing, turning, stretching, lifting or moving involve mind and matter (nāma and rūpa). They are continually arising and passing away as causes and effects. Through this constant arising and passing away, we are able to see the truth of dukkha...

 
 
Soma Thera
Treasures-of-the Noble
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The treasures of the noble disciples of the Buddha are not precious stones and pearls, silver and gold, or fields and houses. Nor are the noble treasures connected with the power and glory of earthly sovereignty; These are the seven treasures the noble have: Confidence, virtue, the sense of shame and fear, Learning, bounty, and understanding right. Not poor is the man endowed with these, Not empty is his life of worthy things. Therefore should he who is in understanding fixed, Be diligent working to gain confidence, Virtue, clarity, and vision of the truth, Mindful of the law of him who understood.

 
 
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Silananda, Sayadaw U
Volition and the Law of Kamma
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The popular meaning of "kamma" is action or doing, but in the Buddhist sense it means volition or willing or intending. When we do something, there is volition or willing behind it, and that effort of the will is called "kamma." You intend to do what you do and you reap the result of your intentions and actions.

 
 
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Maha Boowa
Water for the Fires of the World
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This is Venerable Ācariya Mahā Boowa’s Dhamma Talk, given on the 27th of October, 1981, translated by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu, in which Ajahn Maha Boowa talks about the attraction of the defilements compared to fire and how to calm and eradicate their influence by concenrtation on wholesome rather than unwholeome mind factors. Cooling the fires is the figure of speech used for following the path of purification to be free of the influences of harmful elements.

 
 
Soma Thera
Way of Mindfulness
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The Satipaþþhána Sutta, the Discourse on the Foundations of Mindfulness, is generally regarded as the canonical Buddhist text with the fullest instructions on the system of meditation unique to the Buddha’s own dispensation. The practice of Satìpaþþhána meditation centres on the methodical cultivation of one simple mental faculty readily available to all of us at any moment. This is the faculty of mindfulness, the capacity for attending to the content of our experience as it becomes manifest in the immediate present. What the Buddha shows in the sutta is the tremendous, but generally hidden, power inherent in this simple mental function, a power that can unfold all the mind’s potentials culminating in final deliverance from suffering

 
 
Horner, I. B.
Women in Early Buddhist Literature
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In India, at the time when the Buddha was living and teaching, women were emerging into a relatively free state after they had suffered a certain amount of ignominy, of obedience and subservience to men, and exclusion from this or that worldly occupation, from religious education and observances, which is made out to have been their portion in pre-Buddhist Indian epochs. We have to be a little on our guard against such statements, however, because there is a lack of evidence that women were debarred from taking part in the great debates on philosophical matters that were a feature of Indian life during the Buddha's time, and certainly women had an emergence in the Fourfold Sangha  community, and we have quite substantial records of how they lived and what they did.

 

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